9.23.2013

There is no certainty, there is only adventure.





 

I stumbled upon this poster, "There is no certainty, there is only adventure", as I was hurrying to shuttle a friend to the train station in Hudson, NY. He came from Brooklyn to visit with us in our tiny rented cabin in the tiny hamlet of Claverack in Columbia County. That morning our brunch service was slow. Our food was delicious. Our conversation was impassioned.

And this combination of events led to the type of delay that forces train passengers to leap from moving cars and sprint to trains as conductors are just about to pull away and said sprinter is the very last passenger to board the train before it heads back to Manhattan. Phew! He made it. 

But the point is--I think it's true. As I think back to that hurried moment after brunch dashing to the train and watching our dear friend leap aboard and then pull away from the station--this poster really comes to life. There is no certainty, there is only adventure. And as I think back to the last four weeks of this amazing time spent with family and friends and family friends from all across this beautiful region of Upstate New York, I simply feel full of adventure.

And as much as I'd like to think there IS certainty (certainty of love, of justice, of creativity, of imagination, of transformation, of possibility, of growth, of expansion) I'm pretty sure there is no certainty in the end. No certain way to attain what we most want to attain, no certainty of happiness, of protection, of destination, of progress, of success, but instead there is only adventure.

Only the moment. Only staying present and trying to stay intentional and trying to have a sense of humor and a sense of conviction as we speed through the charming city of Hudson, NY and arrive at the train station. Uncertain if the conductor will still let us board, we charge ahead with our pounding hearts flush with adventure.

I'll be back in California by next Monday's post--so I'll see you from the West Coast very soon.

xoxo,
k

8 comments:

  1. i love it. the poster and your post about it. see you soon i hope!

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    1. shash! oh, i wish that poster was for sale. so happy you liked this post. means so much from someone as talented as you! xo

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  2. It's funny that this post is about Adventure and (un)certainty and in Hudson all at once. As you know, Hudson/Columbiaville and surround is so very dear to me and where my roots are.. I only remember adventure there. I only remember seeing and doing all the great things that made a kid happy. I stayed for long summers there. I was told stories, listened to bullfrogs at night and went to an old auction barn to get complete junk, while my dad waved and nodded for cross country skis that were rusted out and some baskets for my mother. I stepped into the library downtown and saw what they saw. The orphans. You see, it had been closed for many years, and before that in the 40's, was an orphanage. My mother had to walk past every day with her body guard "Chick" (a guy who worked with G'ma at the Fireman's Home that was told to do this. She had that way in her broken English and triple layer of house coats) You listened, and she didn't mince anything. Well, we went in and had an adventure. My mother was suddenly 10 and her purse, a lunch pail. I was with her, watching as she went up the narrow steps and looked to see what they saw, amazed all the way through.

    We also went to the movie house, and to the church where they wed, and we ALWAYS had to go by the house with a dollhouse of it in the backyard on State St. (That was for me).

    Hudson was hard and tough and rough for a long time until recent years. I am glad to see it back to what it was before I was known. Hudson was hard for a long time too for us. It was where we buried them all, and where they fought and tangled. The Rowen brothers, my grandfather.

    Ah, a wonderful place. I could go on and on, but I will not. I'll save it for when I can take my family there and relive it again. That is certain.

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    1. yes, yes. the flooding of memory and feeling from the spaces that we inhabited as kids. or from the stories of our parents. hudson has certainly gone through many changes. it seems i tend towards vibrant cities that seem to be in flux with expanding artists communities and all the complications that this brings. (this could be a novel.) but it was very good to be there. i applaud your memories. xoxo

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  3. Thank you for such a thoughtful post. The message is so true!

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    1. valerie: oh, good. what good cheer you are.

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  4. love. i need a piece of you in person. xoxo

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    1. kj: yes! i need to see you soon. while that beautiful baby is still being carried around in your beautiful belly. sending you so much love. must tea soon. xo

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Thank you for your comments, friends. I like to think we are creating a dialogue in this space--building a virtual community.