10.08.2013

The Very First Loves: Putting the Text in Textile






My friends,

I'm thinking about poetry. And about books. And about text. And thinking about how this love affair was really the launching point for my own creative work so many years ago. How poetry was my first creative love. How I was 14-years-old and scrawling poems in my notebook while hiding out in my bedroom or under the shade of the giant birch tree in the backyard.

And how sewing was a close second love. Not necessarily the horrid sweatshirt I made in 8th grade Home Economics class but the dresses I started making when I was a senior in high school. And how, in so many ways, I'm still making that same dress today. And we have to honor the first loves, the first passions, the first whims of artistry and creativity in our selves and in the children in our lives. Well, because, we just never know.

And so poetry is making its way back into my work once again--I'm not certain it ever really left but it feels like it's taken a backseat of sorts. But very recently I had my friend, Jen Hewett, print these poems for me on linen with gray ink. And she made some labels for me while she was at it. These two short poems are adapted from my very first poetry manuscript--still lingering in my computer files long after submitting my thesis and finishing graduate school where that manuscript began. Maybe someday.

These poems are shorter versions of poems that appear in that collection. But instead of being tucked into computer files and printed pages, these poems will be tucked into hems and pockets of future handmade clothing. Offering a bit of text to the textile work in my studio or to the text/ile, if you will. A way to say, "Hello, old friend. I haven't forgotten you, I've just taken the scenic route again."

xoxo,
k

8 comments:

  1. lovely. I look forward to seeing your work in print!

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    1. aw, thanks! me too. someday.

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  2. This is wonderful, wondrous and so special. I love details, although I fail myself to incorporate them into the big picture sometimes.

    Whenever my parents would re-wallpaper, paint or re-finish a wall, we'd always write messages to the people that will uncover them in 20/40/100 years. I can remember one time that Nicki and I wrote about how we were getting ready for a dance (u.g.h.) while in Middle School. How completely stomach sickening to think what I wrote and what the little-girl-trying-to-be-cool said. However, someone will later meet that girl, and perhaps their life is resonant of that. I wish we did that at our places. (Nate would have to sit down from anxiety, I am sure)
    We too found messages in some closets (they remain) from the kids that lived in the house when it was built. My parents STILL have contact with him, who is very elderly now. He has the same birthday as me.

    All of this is what makes up the definition of special. Your packet notes remind me of it. It's a true signature of your work physically, and also a piece of your creative, sweet soul.

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    1. oh goodness. the thought of finding messages from owners past is so magical. makes me think of staying on a farm in england and finding the message "snowed all day" scrawled into the beams of the barn. it was magic. xoxo

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  3. Both the inspiration behind your project, and your words, are so beautiful. I can't think of anything more lovely than discovering a little poem tucked inside an item of clothing. A totem of happiness. And your printed poems are glorious. I so look forward to seeing how your project develops.

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    1. kate: oh, what a kind comment. thank you, thank you. i am so excited to finally have these little fabric poems to add to sewing creations. xo

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  4. Beautiful Katrina--just catching up with you! Love everything!!!

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    1. helloooo! so nice to hear from you again. thank you for the very kind words. i hope all is well in your corner of the world. xoxo.

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Thank you for your comments, friends. I like to think we are creating a dialogue in this space--building a virtual community.